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Lesson 5
Plurals and Agreement

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Nouns in D'ni are very similar to nouns in English: they name a person, place, thing, or idea; they can be singular and plural; and they do not have a gender or case, as they do in other foreign languages. A singular noun names just one of a thing, while a plural noun names more than one. In D'ni, as in English, the singular noun is the root word; to make it plural, we add the suffix –tE (‑tee | -tí), the same way that in English we add -(e)s.

Examples:

ter (tehr | ter), tree, becomes tertE (tehrtee | tertí), trees
Kor (kor | kor), book becomes  KortE (kortee | kortí), books

Some D'ni nouns only have plural forms. The same sorts of nouns exist in English, words like pants or scissors, which never occur in the singular and always end in -e(s). In D'ni, these kinds of nouns will always have the –tE suffix — the word DantE (dahntee | dantí), for example, will always end in –tE, whether referring to just one pair or more than one pair of tweezers.

D'ni adjectives are also very similar to adjectives in English: they describe nouns and have only one form. That is, in order to agree with the noun they modify, they do not need to change to reflect singular and plural. The same adjective can modify both forms of the noun. The one significant departure from noun-adjective agreement in English is that adjectives always follow the noun they describe in D'ni; in English they can come before or after the noun.

Examples:

ter para (tehr pahrah | ter para), great tree
tertE para (tehrtee pahrah | tertí para), great trees
DantE prin (dahntee prihn | dantí prin), small tweezers

D'ni adjectives can do many things in addition to modifying nouns, things that we will learn more about in future lessons. For now, it is important to remember that adjectives do not need to change to agree with singular and plural nouns, and that they always come after the noun they modify.

 
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